Ford Motor Company Fund teams up with the Corner!

Teens Cope with COVID-19 and Mental Health Stressors

Amid isolation and uncertainty, a reminder to youth: You're not alone

When COVID-19 struck the United States early this year, the world as we knew it changed. Countries began tallying up their dead, borders closed, cities and businesses shut down, and more than 120,000 schools swiftly ceased in-person learning for more than 72 million K-12 and college students.

The lockdowns ended time with precious friends and family, travel, graduation ceremonies, proms, birthday parties and entertainment outings. They resulted in millions of job losses and a collectively high level of stress that hadn't been seen in decades.

African American female with short hair wearing pearl earrings, opera length necklace with white collar showing from beneath celery green, burnt orange with black diamond shapes
Kamilah Davis-Wilson, community outreach and education manager for The Corner Health Center in Ypsilanti, Mich.

In particular, the pandemic's subsequent effects—uncertainty, isolation, unrest and disappearance of opportunities—are putting young people at risk for higher rates of depression, anxiety and suicide.

"How do we expect youth to process it all?" asked Kamilah Davis-Wilson, community outreach and education manager for The Corner Health Center in Ypsilanti, Mich., which provides health and mental health services to 12- to 25-year-olds and their children.

Adenike Griffin, behavioral health manager at the center, said society isn't equipped for the after-effects of COVID and likely won't be even after vaccines and treatment are developed.

"I don't think we're prepared for people's inability to cope," Griffin said. "There will likely be higher rates of depression, anxiety, PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) and more profound mental illnesses, like psychosis. The effects are going to be huge. We're going to need to pull together as many resources as we can to create a new normal."

African American female with short hair wearing black top and unlined jersey knit jacket
Adenike Griffin, behavioral health manager at The Corner Health Center in Ypsilanti, Mich.

The Ford Motor Company Fund, the auto company's philanthropic arm, is responding by increasing its support of mental health awareness and treatment. Among its initiatives, the nonprofit is partnering with the Corner Health Center on a series of virtual discussions for 12- to 19-year-olds. Topics include social isolation; anxiety, depression and social unrest, suicidality; and grief and the holidays.

"We know mental illnesses in youth have been on the rise over the past several years, and the pandemic has given us even more reason to bring resources to this space," said Lisa Gonzalez, a manager at the Ford Motor Company Fund. "Our team continues to look at new ways we can partner with specialists and bring forth resources free of charge to teens in this new virtual world. It is important to give our youth the tools necessary to improve their mental health in a safe setting which can hopefully translate to an open dialog between family and friends."

In this story, we explore how COVID-19 is affecting young people in this country and provide information to help parents and guardians alleviate their distress.

View the full article here


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